Halloween Streamin’ Day Two! God’s Left Hand, Devil’s Right Hand (2006)

Halloween Streamin’ Day Two! God’s Left Hand, Devil’s Right Hand (2006)

English Title God’s Left Hand, Devil’s Right Hand
Japanese Title Kami no Hidari-te Akuma no Migi-te
Kana Title 神の左手、悪魔の右手
Director Shusuke Kaneko
Story by Kazuo Umezu
Release Date 2006
Distributor Toshiba
Sub Genre Slasher

If you’re not aware of Kazuo Umezu’s God’s Left Hand, Devil’s Right Hand, it’s a strange manga to say the least. Released in the late 1980s, some two decades after the mangaka’s better known, ‘spooky’, kid friendly horror manga, God’s Left Hand, Devil’s Right Hand looks every bit an attempt by Umezu to outdo gross out king Hideshi Hino in sheer surrealist brutality.

The movie, as with the manga, follows a young boy named Sou who is cursed by a telepathic link with a brutal serial killer, forced to watch teenagers die through the eyes of the murderer while he sleeps. As his telepathic link deepens, Sou is hospitalised as the wounds of the killer’s victims begin to materialise on the boy himself. In order to save Sou’s life, his sister Izumi must tracks down the killer and put an end to his rampage to save her brother’s life.

God’s Left Hand, Devil’s Right Hand combines the first and fourth ‘episodes’ of the manga, though leaning much heavier on the latter. If you’re not familiar with the manga, the first frame has protagonist Sou awakening from a nightmare to find scissors protruding from his sister’s eyeballs. Within 100 she’s strapped to a hospital bed vomiting up the corpses of seven children murdered thirty years ago by a Kuchisake figure with garden sheers, before birthing their tricycles and covering her classmates in blood and mud.

If that doesn’t tip you off, the manga’s entire purpose is an exercise in surrealist excess and nightmarish visions of the most disgusting kind. So the film? Ehh…

Looking incredibly cheap, it’s hard to become all that engrossed in God’s Left Hand, Devil’s Right Hand; a surprise given Kaneko released the first of his high profile Death Note movies in the same year. A low-budget isn’t necessarily the death knell for a horror movie, it’s possibly the only genre where it can actually help, but with cinematography completely devoid of character and shockingly lifeless direction, scenes are often silly rather than suspenseful.  

Similarly, while Shusuke Kaneko regular, Ai Maeda and Japanese genre film-legend Tomorowo Taguchi help give the film some credibility when on-screen, the supporting actors have it looking incredibly like a student film. Immediately after watching the film I just had to find out if this was a TV special sold as a movie in the West, but that doesn’t appear to be the case. Given the strong sense of style and direction in Kaneko’s Gamera films it’s truly baffling to figure out what happened here.

Without a sense of surrealism or budget to appropriately pull off the manga, God’s Left Hand, Devil’s Right Hand is a slog of a film to get through. A Kazuo Umezu story as directed by Shusuke Kaneko and starring Tomorowo Taguchi sounds like an incredible proposition, but don’t be fooled, there really isn’t much here to enjoy.

God’s Left Hand, Devil’s Right Hand is currently available to stream on CONtv.

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Previous Halloween Streamin' Day One! Yellow Fangs (1990)
Next Halloween Streamin' Day 3! Idol is Dead (2012)

About author

Craig Hatch
Craig Hatch 41 posts

<p>Horror Japan is Craig Hatch, a Brit currently living in Tokyo, Japan. Horror Japan is a project that aims to review and collate media from all aspects of Japanese horror culture.</p>

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Editor review

Rating
2/5

2

Fair
2
Summary

Without a sense of surrealism or budget to appropriately pull off the manga, God’s Left Hand, Devil’s Right Hand is a slog of a film to get through. A Kazuo Umezu story as directed by Shusuke Kaneko and starring Tomoro Taguchi sounds like an incredible proposition, but don’t be fooled, there really isn’t much here to enjoy.